NCRI - Extreme poverty blighting Iran's population has lead to the open sale of human organs on a road known as 'kidney street' in the capital Tehran.

The walls of buildings along 'Farhang Hosseini' Street are daubed with advertisements with phone numbers and a blood group of people selling a kidney.

The price of the organ varies widely depending on the seller's need, but usually range from 3,000 to 20,000 US dollars each, according to reports. It is estimated that around 1,400 Iranians have sold a kidney to an unknown recipient.

Iran has no laws on the buying and selling the human organs of living persons, prompting a recent sharp increase in trade as the population's poverty increases amid the regime's collapsing economy.

Iran nephrology association head Doctor Ganji said: "Of all the kidney transplantations currently being carried out in Iran, only 30 per cent are from deceased people, while the rest are from living persons."

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