HomeIran News NowIran Protests & DemonstrationsThe Mounting Global Support of the Ongoing Anti-regime Iran Protests  

The Mounting Global Support of the Ongoing Anti-regime Iran Protests  

A nationwide uprising continues to expand across Iran. Demonstrations began shortly after the tragic murder of Mahsa Amini by the regime’s morality police on September 16. Mahsa’s name has been trending on social media, symbolizing the plight of a nation, and has become the code name of new rounds of Iran protests in 2022.  

The ongoing protests in Iran and Mahsa’s death have triggered worldwide solidarity with people and condemnation of Iran’s ruling theocracy.  Below are the latest international community’s reactions to Iran’s uprising, sorted by the date. 

September 27

The UN human rights office condemned the violent crackdown against protests in Iran.

“Authorities in Iran must fully respect the rights of protestors calling for justice for Mahsa Amini, the young woman who died in custody after being arrested for allegedly violating strict dress codes,” the UN human rights office, OHCHR, said on Tuesday.

Spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Ravina Shamdasani: “We are very concerned by the continued violent response by security forces to protests in Iran, as well as communications restrictions affecting landline and mobile usage, the Internet and social media platforms. Thousands have joined anti-government demonstrations throughout the country over the past 11 days. Security forces have responded at times with live ammunition.”

“Our Office reiterates our call upon the Iranian authorities to fully respect the rights to freedom of opinion, expression, peaceful assembly and association, as a State party to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.”

Australia condemned the violent crackdown in Iran. Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs Senator Penny Wong and Minister for Finance, Public Service and Women Affairs Senator Katy Gallagher issued a joint statement, condemning “the deadly and disproportionate use of force against protesters in Iran, following the tragic death of the 22-year-old Mahsa Amini”.

September 26

The German government summoned the Iranian regime’s ambassador in Berlin on Monday over the brutal crackdown on nationwide protests, a German foreign ministry spokesperson told Reuters. Asked about the possibility of further sanctions on Tehran in response to the unrest, the spokesperson said, “we will consider all options” with other European Union states.

US Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters at the White House daily press briefing: “The President stated at UNGA, ‘[W]e stand with the brave citizens and brave women of Iran who right now are demonstrating to secure their basic rights.’ Women in Iran should have the right to wear what they want, free from violence or harassment. Iran must end its use of violence against women for exercising their fundamental freedoms.

“On September 21st, the Iranian government cut off, as you know, access to the Internet for most of its 80 million citizens as — as courageous Iranians take to the streets to protest the death of Mahsa Amini. The United States is taking action to support the free flow of information to the Iranian people.”

In a statement, the Australian Green Party expressed their solidarity with the women of Iran and announced: “The Australian Greens are calling upon the international community to condemn the ongoing abuses of freedom and human rights. Those responsible for Mahsa Amini’s death must be held accountable through a criminal investigation. The Australian Government should meet with the Iranian ambassador as soon as possible to raise these concerns directly.”

Reporters Without Borders (RSF) issued a statement, calling on the Iranian regime’s authorities to stop the crackdown on journalists and to release those detained.

“By stepping up the crackdown on journalists amid a burst of violence after blocking access to WhatsApp and Instagram, the Iranian government has taken another harsh step to violate press freedom.” RSF’s Middle East desk said, “RSF demands the immediate release of the detained journalists and the immediate lifting of all restrictions on the right to information in Iran, a right that is more essential than ever at this time of crisis.”

September 25

During an interview with ABC News, US national security adviser Jake Sullivan said: “The fact that we are in nuclear talks is in no way slowing us down from speaking out and acting on behalf of the people of Iran,” he said. “We’re not going to slow down one inch in our defense and advocacy for the rights of the women and citizens of Iran.”

The European Union’s High Representative issued a statement and announced: “For the European Union and its member states, the widespread and disproportionate use of force against nonviolent protestors is unjustifiable and unacceptable. People in Iran, as anywhere else, have the right to peaceful protest. That right must be ensured in all circumstances.”

“The EU and its member states urge the Iranian authorities to strictly abide by the principles enshrined in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which Iran is a party. Therefore, we expect Iran to immediately stop the violent crackdown on protests and ensure internet access, as well as the free flow of information. Furthermore, we expect Iran to clarify the number of deaths and arrested, release all non-violent protestors and provide due process to all detainees. Moreover, the killing of Mahsa Amini must be duly investigated and any proved responsible for her death must be held accountable. We take note of the President of Iran’s statement in that respect.”

“The European Union will continue to consider all the options at its disposal ahead of the next Foreign Affairs Council, to address the killing of Mahsa Amini and the way Iranian security forces have responded to the ensuing demonstrations.”

September 24

September 23

At a press briefing in Washington, senior United States administration officials explained the US government’s efforts to advance the free flow of information for the Iranian people.

A senior US State Department official said: “Mahsa Amini senselessly and tragically died, and now the Government of Iran, rather than responding to the peaceful protesters rightly angry about her loss by addressing the fundamental problems that led to it, is simply violently suppressing protests.  And as part of that, on Wednesday, the Iranian Government cut off access to the internet for most of its 80 million citizens to prevent them and the rest of the world from watching its violent crackdown. While Iran’s government is cutting off people’s access to the global internet and to each other, today the United States is taking action to support the free flow of information to and among the Iranian people.”

“So as a result of the coordination over the course of the last year, year and a half, today the Department of Treasury has issued General License D-2, updating its guidance to expand the range of internet services available to Iranians.”

In a tweet on September 23, Justin Trudeau, the Canadian Prime Minister also supported the Iranian people. “Canada strongly supports people who are expressing themselves and protesting peacefully in Iran. We are calling on the Iranian regime to end its repression of freedom of expression – and to end the ongoing harassment of, and discrimination against, women.” 

Professor Javaid Rehman, UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran gave an interview to Euronews about the situation.

“This law violates fundamental human rights and violates women’s inherent dignity. There are a number of reasons why people are coming out to protest. Iranian authorities have used excessive force against innocent protestors who are simply asking for their rights to be recognized,” he said.

During an interview, U.S. Representative to the United Nations Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield said: “What we see happening in Iran today, and what they have done in terms of committing human rights violations against their own people. And we have taken actions to hold those individuals, the moral police as they are called, and those involved in the security sector who are committing human rights violations. We imposed sanctions on them just yesterday.”

As the regime has once again imposed an internet blackout to suppress protesters and stifle their voice, many lawmakers and prominent figures are calling for providing Iranian protesters with satellite internet.  

September 22

The United States Treasury Department sanctioned the regime’s morality police for “abuse and violence against Iranian women and the violation of the rights of peaceful Iranian protestors.” 

“Mahsa Amini was a courageous woman whose death in Morality Police custody was yet another act of brutality by the Iranian regime’s security forces against its own people,” said the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Janet L. Yellen. 

In a similar action on September 22, German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock condemned the “brutal attack” on Iranians protesting the death in custody of Mahsa Amini.  “We are on the side of the courageous women in Iran,” Baerbock told reporters on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly. “The brutal attack on the courageous women in Iran is also an attack on humanity.” 

Baerbock said Germany would ask the UN Human Rights Council to address the repression as a violation “of women’s rights and thus human rights.” “This makes clear that if women’s rights are trampled on, if one has no other weapon than to violently crackdown, then it’s the weakest kind of authority.” 

On September 22, the UN independent human rights experts strongly condemned Mahsa Amini’s death, underlining that Mahsa was “another victim of Iran’s sustained repression and systematic discrimination against women and the imposition of discriminatory dress codes that deprive women of bodily autonomy and the freedoms of opinion, expression, and belief.”  

“We strongly condemn the use of physical violence against women and the denial of fundamental human dignity when enforcing compulsory hijab policies ordained by State authorities,” their statement read.  

David Jones, a former British Minister, and current conservative MP, also voiced his support for the Iran protests on September 22. “Protests in Iran following the death of Mahsa Amini are spreading. The regime responds by attempting to suppress.  WhatsApp and Instagram have been taken down.  It is a crucial moment. The international community must rally behind the brave Iranian people.”  

In a similar post on September 22, Irwin Cotler, the founder, and chair of the Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights supported the Iranian people yearning for freedom. “Iranian women are demonstrating boundless bravery in the face of brutal repression from the regime in Iran. All people of conscience should stand with them in their call for freedom and dignity. As criminal Raisi is at UN, Iranians are being brutalized in streets.” 

“Mass internet shutdowns by the regime in Iran will be used to massacre civilians struggling for their basic human rights. Countries & companies should stand with Iranian people, help evade this blood-soaked censorship and impunity and sanction the architects of repression,” he added. 

In a statement on September 22, Congresswoman Claudia Tenney led a bipartisan letter with Congressman Tom Malinowski calling on the US Treasury Department to “do everything in its power to help the Iranian people stay connected to the Internet.”  

“Treasury should quickly approve any licensing requests it receives from tech and Internet companies, including Elon Musk’s Star Link. It’s our policy to stand with the Iranian people. We must do everything we can at this moment to make sure their voices are heard.” 

Issuing a statement, the British Committee for Iran Freedom strongly condemned the death in custody of the young Iranian woman Mahsa Amini. The BCFIF statement concluded: “The international community must, as a matter of urgency, collectively support the popular campaign for justice in Iran by establishing an international commission led by the UN to investigate past and current human rights abuses by the regime with a view to prosecuting those responsible in an international tribunal.”

September 21

In an urgent action on September 21, Amnesty International urged world leaders to “support calls for the establishment of an independent international investigative and accountability mechanism to address the prevailing crisis of impunity in Iran.”  

“The global outpouring of rage and empathy over Mahsa Amini’s death must be followed by concrete steps by the international community to tackle the crisis of systemic impunity that has allowed widespread torture, extrajudicial executions , and other unlawful killings by Iranian authorities to continue unabated both behind prison walls and during protests,” said Diana Eltahawy, Deputy Director for the Middle East and North Africa at Amnesty International. 

Mike Pompeo, the former US Secretary of State, expressed his support for the Iranian people on Twitter on September 21. “The American people stand with the brave protesters in Iran. Iranians deserve so much better than this terrorist regime.”  

Lord David Alton, a prominent member of the UK House of Lords, also supported the Iranian people and their organized Resistance movement on September 21. “The U.K. should support the yearnings and wishes of the Iranian people to reject dictatorship in any form and to establish a republic based on the democratic Plan of NCRI’s Mrs. Maryam Rajavi, for a free, non-nuclear Iran, separation of religion and state, and a democratic system.” 

September 16

“Mahsa Amini’s death after injuries sustained while in police custody for wearing an ‘improper’ hijab is an appalling and egregious affront to human rights,” a spokesperson for Joe Biden’s National Security Council told reporters. “Our thoughts are with Mahsa’s family and loved ones.” 

“Women in Iran should have the right to wear what they want, free from violence or harassment. Iran must end its use of violence against women for exercising their fundamental freedoms,” they continued. “There must be accountability for Mahsa’s death.”